There are Different Types of Bullying

  • Physical Bullying

  • Non-Physical Bullying
    • Verbal
      Social Alienation
      Intimidation
      Indirect
  • Cyber

  • Read More

    Physical Bullying

    Physical bullying includes any physical contact that would hurt or injure a person like hitting, kicking, punching, etc.
    Taking something that belongs to someone else and destroying it would also be considered a type of physical bullying. For example, if someone was walking down the street and someone came up to them and shoved them to the ground, that would be physical bullying. In elementary and middle schools, 30.5% of all bullying is physical.

    Non Physical Bullying

  • Verbal bullying
  • is name-calling, making offensive remarks, or joking about a person's religion, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or the way they look. For example, if there was a group of kids who made fun of another kid because he couldn't run as fast as everyone else, it would be an example of verbal bullying. 46.5% of all bullying in schools is the verbal type. Verbal aggression is when a bully teases someone. It can also include a bully making verbal threats of violence or aggression against someone's personal property.
  • Indirect bullying includes spreading rumors or stories about someone, telling others about something that was told to you in private, and excluding others from groups. An example would be if you started a rumor that a boy in your class likes playing with dolls, and if the reason that you made up the story was because you thought it was funny. This would be indirect bullying. Indirect bullying accounts for 18.5% of all bullying.
  • Social alienation is when a bully excludes someone from a group on purpose. It also includes a bully spreading rumors, and also making fun of someone by pointing out their differences.
  • Intimidation is when a bully threatens someone else and frightens that person enough to make him or her do what the bully wants.


  • Some Bullying Stats


    If anyone believes that bullying doesn’t take it’s toll on families, schools, and society take a look at the statistics below.

  • 60% of middle school students say that they have been bullied, while 16% of staff believe that students are bullied.
  • 160,000 students stay home from school everyday due to bullying. (NEA)
  • 30% of students who reported they had been bullied said they had at times brought weapons to school.
  • A bully is 6 times more likely to be incarcerated by the age of 24.
  • A bully is 5 times more likely to have a serious criminal record when he grows up.
  • 2/3 of students who are targets become bullies.
  • 20% of all children say they have been bullied.
  • 20% of high school students say they have seriously considered suicide with the last 12 months.
  • 25% of students say that teachers intervened in bullying incidents while 71% of teachers say they intervened.
  • The average child has watched 8,000 televised murders and 100,000 acts of violence before finishing elementary school.
  • In schools where there are bullying programs bullying is reduced by 50%.


  • View Stats on Bullying at: Cyber Bullying Statistics


    Cyber Bullying

     

    Cyber Bullying
    is done by sending messages, pictures, or information using electronic media, computers (email & instant messages), or cell phones (text messaging & voicemail). For instance, if you sent a picture of a snake in an email to a person because you know that they are afraid of snakes, that would be an example of cyberbullying.

    The methods used are limited only by the child's imagination and access to technology. And the cyberbully one moment may become the victim the next. The kids often change roles, going from victim to bully and back again.

    Children have killed each other and committed suicide after having been involved in a cyberbullying incident.
    Cyberbullying is usually not a one time communication, unless it involves a death threat or a credible threat of serious bodily harm. Kids usually know it when they see it, while parents may be more worried about the lewd language used by the kids than the hurtful effect of rude and embarrassing posts.
    Cyberbullying may rise to the level of a misdemeanor cyberharassment charge, or if the child is young enough may result in the charge of juvenile delinquency. Most of the time the cyberbullying does not go that far, although parents often try and pursue criminal charges. It typically can result in a child losing their ISP or IM accounts as a terms of service violation. And in some cases, if hacking or password and identity theft is involved, can be a serious criminal matter under state and federal law.


    What are the Signs


    Some of the signs that a child is being bullied include:

  • Becoming withdrawn
  • Showing fear when it is time to go to school
  • Increasing signs of depression
  • Decline in school performance
  • Speaking of another child with fear
  • Noticeable decline in how the child sees him or herself
  • Signs of physical altercations, such as bruises, scrapes and other marks

  • It may be more difficult to spot signs of verbal or emotional bullying, but you should be on the lookout for indications that your childaˆ™s self esteem and self image are faltering, as well as a reluctance to go to school.

    You should also be on the alert for signs that your friend or your child is a bully.

    Child bullying behavior can be a precursor to problems later in life, especially criminal activity. It can also affect future professional and personal relationships. It is important that children learn to express themselves in socially acceptable ways, and bullying is not something that most in society tolerate.


    Here are some signs that your child might be a bully:

  • Views violence positively as the solution to most problems
  • Shows aggression toward adults as well as other children
  • Need to dominate others and control situations
  • Easily frustrated
  • Shows little sympathy to others who are being bullied, or who are having problems
  • Won't help stop bullying
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